14 Year Old Takes First Place in USPLA National Championships — Sets an 800lbs Total!

Posted on 18 Oct 2014 16:53

lift-big-red-shield-mobile.png

Follow or Subscribe!

lift-big-fb-button.png?ukey=3ed2ddf7cf508a623de589568cf9c02f95c585b3 lift-big-google-button.png?ukey=6bbef068eb7ddfc2729fafdcfd7894e59694b1c0


Fourteen year old Jake Schellenschlager has been making some weights move and some people gasp with his unusual strength at such a young age. In a sport where most men begin to peak at a much older age than other sports, Jake is deadlifting twice his body weight already.

He recently won 1st place in the USPLA National Powerlifting Championships. He competed in the Junior Men 13-15 division and set a deadlifting record in the process.

In January of this year, he got some national press when the Washington post did a profile on him.

Jake's record deadlift was 330.69, which is a good deadlift for a grown man, despite what legions of wannabe powerlifters might think. His squat was 253.53, and his bench press was 214.95, both amazing.

He will be competing in the finals in November. He is from the Glen Burnie area outside Baltimore, MD, and trains at the World Gym there. He hasn't been lifting since he was a little boy, as you might expect. He started lifting after he began accompanying his father to the gym. At that time, he could deadlift 300lbs. Watch the video below.





"So what?" you ask. To have a deadlift of 300lbs around January of this year, and then to manage a record lift of over 330 in September is a serious improvement!

Teens competing in powerlifting is not unusual. Thousands do. Many, will question the judgement of his parents and ask whether strength training and lifting maximum weights will "damage" him. This fear is born of a myth. The myth is that lifting heavy weights is more damaging to the joints — and cant stunt growth — than any other sport. While it is true that joints could be damaged by faulty training that emphasizes faster jumps than necessary, there is absolutely no evidence that strength training with maximum weights damages a young body more than other sports.

In fact, statistically, it is other, more high-impact athletics that do the most damage! Gymnastics and some kinds of dance are much more punishing to a young body than lifting weights! The forces involved in any kind of high-impact sport are much greater that the forces encountered with even the heaviest weights possible. Weight training, as this sarcastic follow-up from USA today will attest, has a stigma attached to it that it absolutely does not deserve.

© 2017 by Lift BIG. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.