Calling Bullshit On Weak-Ass Little Strength Trainers Who Juggle More Words Than Weight

Posted on 15 Oct 2014 15:04

lift-big-red-shield-mobile.png

Follow or Subscribe!

lift-big-fb-button.png?ukey=3ed2ddf7cf508a623de589568cf9c02f95c585b3 lift-big-google-button.png?ukey=6bbef068eb7ddfc2729fafdcfd7894e59694b1c0


Guest post by Eric Troy of Ground Up Strength

What is weak to me? Talking and no doing is weak to me. Preaching to others about things you are not willing to do yourself. Thinking you can achieve something great with no risks, and letting that fear infect those you claim to want to help. What is little to me? People who manipulate and wheedle to get what they want. One thing about lifting the heaviest of weights: You can't teach someone to do it while disdaining the practice yourself!

You can't train people with words, and a lot of roundabout bullshit that tries to make up for the fact that you are completely out of your depth. You want to know what I think about whether a 'strength coach' needs to be strong? They don't. However, a guy that deadlifts 200 coaching a guy who deadlifts 600 isn't something you see too often. Why is that? Can you teach someone to climb a mountain that is twice as high as you've ever climbed? Where the air is so much thinner and the dangers so much more acute?

Let's cut the bullshit. Yeah, there are strong guys who think they can train someone and they can't, but there are just as many non-training weak-ass little word-crazy trainers who are out of their depth because they don't know what it's like to hold, support, or yes, lift so much weight, or to perform to any such high level. They try to make up for that with bullshit.

Is it really about the physical strength they actually possess? No, it is about willingness and intention to go there! If you don't have the willingness to go where you expect the client to go…to the extreme of performance, than when you talk about performance you're talking out of your ass! Even if your max squat is 175 but that max squat represents you going for it like there is no tomorrow, then you're more legit than the guy who lifts only 175 because that is nice and safe and he doesn't like to do less than 8 frigging reps!


strongman.jpg
strongman.jpg


See that strongman in the image above? What's the difference between him and you, Mr. Smart Guy trainer? Is it that he is very strong? Is it that he competes? Is it that he can coach? No, it's that he wants something much worse than you
can imagine. And it's not adulation and pats on the back!

Performance doesn't mean "pretty, safe, palatable, and kind of better at it than you were before." Performance means achieving the best at that particular expression of the human body that you can at any one time. Risks are part of anything that brings great rewards. If you think you can get there with no risks, you'll never really get there…although you might love telling yourself you did.

If you want to be a trainer who trains someone to get as strong as possible, you must be willing to go there yourself. Otherwise, you can help moms with that flab under their arms and preach about glutes and all that bullshit while telling yourself you cover all the bases and know all the right words.

I am tired of the bullshit in the fitness industry. It's full of fakers who are out of their depth but desperate to hide it and make a buck. You can't coach heavy lifting if you don't, at some level, love lifting! In order to get maximally strong, you have to, at times, approach that threshold: The edge of the cliff! Expecting to teach other people to go there when you're afraid of it? Bullshit!

I use the term maximum strength all the time for a very good reason. I want to be as specific as possible. Maximum means maximum. That way, I don't have to listen to some wanna-be telling me about all the possible definitions of 'strength.' Bullshitters love equivocation. I speak for the real lifters out there. So let me tell any strength trainer faker out there who thinks he can bullshit us: Real lifters know exactly what we mean by the word strong! You aren't fooling us with your clever little manipulations of the concept of strong. To us, it is not a concept, or theoretical model; it is a real, physical, reality.

Before I end this rant, I want to make clear that I am not referring to the cutesy little internet memes like "Do you even lift?" I have a grave suspicion that people who say that, "don't even lift." If you have a good argument as to a certain practice, it's your argument and reasoning that counts to me, not whether you lift. I am talking about the actual practice, however, of training others, not the practice of talking about it on the internet.

People can have all kinds of strength related goals. And each and every one of those goals are legit. But what is NOT legit is for a trainer to try to fit someone's goals to their limited toolbox. A trainer trains for specific performance. It is NOT your job to pick your client's goals. It is your job to help him or her accomplish those goals. You don't get to redefine the terms of those goals to fit your limited skill-set. If you are not the trainer to train someone to lift heavy, then the right thing to do is to refer them to someone who can. It is perfectly legitimate to do what you do, and let others do what they do.

© 2017 by Lift BIG. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.